Wednesday, August 29, 2007

blood moon






not a cloud, nor a breath of wind.

Twenty four hours of summer, and a ruby moon in the sky.

By sunrise, she had taken off her red dress, and was going to bed in her silver just as I was slipping into the sea.

11 comments:

meggie said...

How lovely Fifi!
What great pics.

jane said...

splendiferous!

jane said...

check your email. Then come up with some lame excuse as to why you're not coming to my party.

ThirdCat said...

Do you really swim at sunrise?

fifi said...

yes. every day.

meli said...

the moon does indeed look lovely in her red dress! last night in this part of the world she was wearing gauze and lace - the whole sky was dappled with transparent white clouds, ablaze with her light, and she shone between them, like a bride.

Ab said...

hey by any chance was that th picture of th recent lunar eclipse???
man, im in awe of you.... so lucky.....hmmm

Moody said...

I have to say, I’m a little bit (ok, more than just a little bit) jealous at your swimming-sea-pool.
It must be divinely to be able to swim in the sea every morning.
*wistful sigh*
:)

fifi said...

I love the bride image, meli. So you are in the sky, and looking at it also.

Yes, ab, it was the lunar eclipse and it was wonderful.

And yes, I am divinely lucky to swim in the sea at dawn every day. Bt we all have some lovely lucky thing that holds us together, all are different.
Thank you for calling by.

it's the little things... said...

Lovely images, as usual. I come here to remind myself there is art in daily life.
And that Fifi is so good at capturing it...

Arcturus said...

Did you take those pictures? Well, it answers a big question I've long had ... does the "Man in the Moon" ... that strange looking "face" created by the lunar mare, craters, and mountains as seen from Earth ... appear "upside down" in the Southern Hemisphere. I thought it would stand to reason, since the perspective from the observer in Australia should indeed be "upside down" compared to someone in North America. But, no, that does not seem to be the case. That is very confusing to me.

The Moon, by the way, keeps the same face to Earth because although it is about 1/6th the size of the Earth, it is only about 1/80th the mass (lacking heavy metals -- it's basically a big, dry rock) and so the Earth long ago tidally locked it so that its orbital and axial rates of rotation are almost (but not quite) the same. The Moon slowly returns the favor through lunar tidal drag ... slowing down the Earth's spin about 2 milliseconds per century as the Moon gets farther away by about 2 centimeters per year. (It's a momentum exchange -- the Earth loses its angular momentum and the Moon gains it as orbital momentum, thus receding from Earth.)

Just thought you'd find that interesting.